Martha Stewart teaches actor Doug Savant how to correctly iron a shirt, the 17th thing everyone should know how to do.

If a crease down the arm is desired, press the edge of the sleeve. It gets really bunchy and does not iron out well, especially on the button side.

When ironing a dress shirt sleeve, it is easiest to line up the bottom seam of the sleeve and press it from the seam to the top of the shirt using firm pressure. If the iron is hot enough and the shirt is slightly damp, you will end up with a beautiful crease at the top of the sleeve, opposite of the sleeve’s seam.
Martha Stewart teaches actor Doug Savant how to correctly iron a shirt, the 17th thing everyone should know how to do.
Before you can iron your shirts, you need to wash them properly. Wash dress shirts in a separate load on the gentle cycle, and hang to dry on hangers with the collar buttons closed. Do not put them in the dryer, as this will wear them out and possibly shrink them.
When ironing a dress shirt sleeve, it is easiest to line up the bottom seam of the sleeve and press it from the seam to the top of the shirt using firm pressure. If the iron is hot enough and the shirt is slightly damp, you will end up with a beautiful crease at the top of the sleeve, opposite of the sleeve’s seam.
Different shirts require different settings but a quality % cotton dress shirt can handle a hot iron. To play it safe, pick a wrinkle down at the bottom of the shirt where it will be tucked in, set your iron to a medium/low setting and dial up the heat until you the fabric respond and wrinkles disappear.
The Collar

4 thoughts on “How to Iron A Dress Shirt Like a Pro”

Different shirts require different settings but a quality % cotton dress shirt can handle a hot iron. To play it safe, pick a wrinkle down at the bottom of the shirt where it will be tucked in, set your iron to a medium/low setting and dial up the heat until you the fabric respond and wrinkles disappear.

Some shirts have pleats in the center or on the sides of the back. To iron the pleats, start by ironing the lower part of the folded fabric, then, starting from the top of the shirt, iron the crease formed by the pleat down the shirt until it naturally flattens out. Lay the sleeve down and press the cuffs flat first.

Then spread the shirt sleeve out as flat as possible before pressing the shirt. Dress shirt sleeves taper as they reach the wrist and often have pleats where they meet the cuff. Treat these pleats as those on the back of the shirt and iron under the folded area first, then iron the from the wrist back up the sleeve toward the body, forming a small, crisp crease. You should have removed any detachable collar stays before washing, but if not, remove them now and lay the collar out flat on the ironing board.

Iron the collar from the center of the collar out toward the points. For a finishing touch, fold the collar for wear and run the iron over the edge of the collar to help the collar hold its shape. We'll send you style advice and intel for the modern man. It gets really bunchy and does not iron out well, especially on the button side. Do you know what the source of this wicked curl is?

So, why would this particular part of the shirt be difficult to keep from curling? One reason might be weight. Plackets are thicker and, by nature, heavier than other parts of the shirt. If your shirts are made from particularly light and flimsy fabric and the plackets are hefty, the sheer weight of the placket is going to pull the collar down a bit creating a curl. Another reason might be that way the shirt has been washed.

If a crease down the arm is desired, press the edge of the sleeve. Now work on the back of the dress shirt. Take your time around the pleat on the back. I find it easier to iron the underside first, then work on the pleat itself. Afterward, transition to the shoulders. Place the narrow end of the ironing board into the sleeve.

This will allow a flat place across the yoke upper shoulder portion of the shirt. Iron the button row. Use the point of the soleplate between each button.

Placing the tip of a spoon over the button may help protect it. Now, flip the shirt over and work on the front. If there is a pocket, iron from the sides to the center like with the collar to avoid creasing. Lastly, work on the front of the collar. Once again iron from the points to the center. Starch is both naughty and nice. Most commercial starches are corn derivatives which help keep your dress shirts sharp and wrinkle free.

In addition, starch can make ironing easier by providing less friction on the iron. Starch residue can also build up on your iron, requiring more frequent cleaning. If you choose to use starch, try spray starch. This allows a much higher degree of control. After spraying the shirt with starch, allow it to absorb into the fabric for about 30 seconds. Then flatten the spot by hand before using a hot iron on the spot.

This will reduce the appearance of flakes. From time-to-time its necessary to clean your iron to keep it in proper working condition. Often a iron-cleaning kit can be found at your local hardware store. Another method which works well is to run a damp cloth over a cool iron to remove any residue. Follow up by rubbing a beeswax candle over the soleplate and rubbing off any excess with a rag.

How Ironing Works Ironing loosens chemical bonds. One dot means the shirt is synthetic.

Step 1: Get the right equipment

Within 5 minutes the iron should be ready and all the shirts moistened. Pull the lightest weight shirt from the bag first, making sure it is evenly wet. If not, spray on a bit more water. 1. Iron the Collar First. Always start by ironing your dress shirt collar. The shirt will look its best the next time you need to do the same. Need a New Iron? The Rowenta Steamforce DW, $, topped our steam iron tests followed by the Panasonic NI-WA, $ Before you can iron your shirts, you need to wash them properly. Wash dress shirts in a separate load on the gentle cycle, and hang to dry on hangers with the collar buttons closed. Do not put them in the dryer, as this will wear them out and possibly shrink them.